The Iraq War & Archaeology
Reviewed Articles Archive One: First 1/2 of April 2003





This is the first archive of the reviewed articles of The Iraq War & Archaeology web site.


Francis Deblauwe, Ph.D.




The articles and other information are listed chronologically, most recent first.
Almost all are accessible for free (or after a free registration) on the internet.  Each time, I try to draw attention to the most relevant tidbits of information, esp. things that were not mentioned before; occasionally, I provide some comment.  The usual warning applies: many links become defective with time.  Inclusion in the list does not in any way mean that I necessarily agree with the opinions expressed in an article.  But for a few exceptions, the occasional photos and figures accompanying reviewed articles are just hotlinked images on other web sites, in other words: do not download them or request permission to publish them from me, for I do not own the copyright to them in any way!  Please do contact the rightful owners if you would like to use them for publication purposes. Finally, for the sake of convenience, all articles and so on are assumed to have been published on US web sites unless indicated otherwise.

  • "Tue Apr 15,12:57 PM ET   -    A [Baghdad] museum employee tries to salvage the pieces after looters ransacked the place. In northern Iraq ( news -web sites ), villagers take up arms against reportedly Kurdish looters.(AFP/File/Cris Bouroncle)" [Yahoo News Photos]


  • Photo: "Painful loss. Iraqi National Museum Deputy Director Mushin Hasan holds his head in his hands as he sits on destroyed artifacts on April 13" [MSNBC]

  • Photo: "National Museum in Baghdad.  An Iraqi guard holds a shredded carpet amid the mess left in the museum by the looters.   AFP Photo" [mid-April, 2003][Boston Globe]

  • Photo: "National Museum in Baghdad.  Iraqi guards walk over the mess of papers and furniture left in disarray by the looters.    AFP Photo" [mid-April, 2003][Boston Globe]

  • Photo: "Das Nationalmuseum als Scherbenhaufen" [the National Museum as a heap of sherds] [Der Standard (Austria), April 14, 2003]

  • "Looters Ransack Museum's Treasure," in The Australian, April 14, 2003: "Gordon Newby, a historian and professor of Middle Eastern studies at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, said the museum's most famous holding may have been tablets with Hammurabi's Code - one of mankind's earliest codes of law [certainly, he didn't mean the famous copy of the Code which is a stela in the Louvre?]."
Photo: "Part of a sculpture lies among rubble in Iraq's National Museum / AFP"

Photo: "Debris at the looted museum as 2,000-year-old sculptures lie broken on the floor"


  • Photo: M. Wiltenburg and Ph. Smucker, "Looters Plunder in Minutes Iraq's Millennia-Old Legacy," in Christian Science Monitor, April 14, 2003: "EMPTY DISPLAY: A man in the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad peers into a smashed case that once held a 4,500-year-old marble plaque. ANDY NELSON/STAFF"


  • Photo: "An armed guard looks at empty shelves after a mob of looters ransacked and looted Iraq ( news -web sites )'s largest archeological museum in Baghdad(AFP/Ramzi Haidar)" [April 14, 2003] [Yahoo News Photos]


Photo: "Ein Mitarbeiter läuft durch die verwüsteten Flure, vorbei an aufgebrochenen Vitrinen  -  AFP" [an employee walks through ransacked floors, past smashed display cases]


Photo: "Retten, was zu retten ist: Ein Iraker zeigt die Zerstörungen nach der Plünderung des Nationalmuseums in Bagdad [To save that what can be saved: An iraqi shows the damage after the looting of the National Museum in Baghdad]" [DPA]

  • Photo: "An employee of the Iraqi National Museum holds an iron rod at the Museum in Baghdad April 13, 2003, to protect the museum's excavated Mesopotamian antiquities and holdings from looters. The U.N. cultural agency UNESCO ( news -web sites ) urged the United States and Britain on Saturday to take immediate steps to protect Iraq ( news -web sites )'s antiquities, after Baghdad looters grabbed museum treasures dating back to the dawn of civilization.  REUTERS/Kyodo" [Yahoo! News Photos]


"Locking the front door
Although most of the museum has been destroyed and its holdings looted, it is now guarded at gunpoint.
Photo: Spencer Platt, Getty"

"Inside the looted museum
Photo: Spencer Platt, Getty"

"The hallway is littered with destroyed art
Photo: Spencer Platt, Getty"
  • Photos: screen captures of the looting of the National Museum as reported on Channel 4 News (UK), April 12, 2003, from The Situation in Iraq web page by the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre (IARC) at the University of Cambridge



  • Photo: "An Iraqi man reads papers at the entrance of the vault of the National Museum in Baghdad Saturday April 12, 2003. Looters opened the museum vault, went on a rampage breaking ancient artifacts stored there by museum authorities before the war started. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)" [Yahoo! News Photos]

  • Photo: "Civilians inspect Torah scrolls stored in the vault of the National Museum in Baghdad, Iraq ( news -web sites ) Saturday April 12, 2003. Looters opened the museum vault, went on a rampage breaking ancient artifacts stored there by museum authorities before the war started. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)" [Yahoo! News Photos]

  • Photo: "An Iraqi civilian walks through the vault of the National Museum in Baghdad, Iraq (  news  -web  sites ) Saturday April 12, 2003. Looters opened the museum vault, went on a rampage breaking ancient artifacts stored there by museum authorities before the war started.   (AP  Photo/Jerome Delay)" [Yahoo! News Photos]

  • Photo: "Residents of Baghdad look at ancient Jewish ark, looted in an annexe of a museum in downtown  of the Iraqi capital, Thursday, April 10, 2003. (AP Photo/Laurent Rebours)" [Yahoo! News Photos]

Photo: "David Josar / S&S.  Army Maj. Christopher Varhola, a cultural and historical anthropologist, said Iraq has an 'unprecedented' number of important mosques, temples and other important archaeological sites."



This site is edited by Belgian archaeologist Francis Deblauwe, Ph.D., living in Streamwood, Illinois (USA), who is affiliated with Archaeos, Inc., and a research associate of the University of Vienna (Austria).